LNKALL








SCAN + LOOK + EXPRESS

Architecture Machine Group Projects: Interactive Portraits, M.I.T. 1980-1982

After LIPSYNC, I began investigating other avenues of interactive facial animation using the AED frame buffer with a head mounted eye tracking device and a Polhemus, a body tracking device. Viewers could direct the gaze, motion and expression of the faces via a helmet or a simple joystick. I made several videotapes shown in various venues: “FIRST NIGHT 1982 in Boston;   “The Pat Hearn Show,” several small video exhibits in the Boston area, and an interactive installation at the1989 SIGGRAPH Art Show in Los Angeles.   I presented them as interactive portraits, at the time, a new form of puppetry.

SCAN

Twenty-five photographs of Raleigh Perkins, stored on an AED Frame Buffer, animated with zoom and pan functions under control of either a head-mounted eye-tracking device or a joystick. Raleigh's eyes follow the eye movement of a viewer wearing eye tracking equipment.   Joystick control allows direct manipulation of the animation.

 

LOOK

Currently on view in Barcelona at Fundació Suñol

Twenty-five photographs of the late artist, Luis Frangella, stored on an AED Frame Buffer, animated with zoom and pan functions under control of either a head-mounted eye-tracking device, body tracking sensors or a joystick.   Luis's head and gaze follows the eye movement of a viewer wearing eye tracking equipment or the head movement of a viewer wearing body tracking sensors.   Joystick control allows direct manipulation of the animation.

 

EXPRESS

Twenty-five photographs of the late artist and art dealer, Pat Hearn, stored on an AED Frame Buffer, animated with zoom and pan functions under joystick or keyboard control.   EXPRESS was a demonstration of a combinatory technique for animating facial expression.   Twenty five primitives, less than needed for a second of video recording, were sufficient to generate eight different facial expression sequences:   five frames for “yawn,” five for “surprise,” three to raise the eyebrows, five to “scrunch” in disgust, and four to bare teeth.   Many expressions could be generated from only two frames; a wink, a blink and sticking out the tongue.   If the puppeteer hesitated too long before enacting a sequence, the image blinked – or, occasionally, wink.  

 

 

 

 

     
   

 

     
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